Trendy Soho’s housing market not exclusively accessible to the wealthy

Many of us might be aware that social housing is defined as cheaper accommodation provided for people on low incomes by government agencies and non-profit organisations.

Many of us might be aware that social housing is defined as cheaper accommodation provided for people on low incomes by government agencies and non-profit organisations. Are you aware however, of its rich history at the centre of UK society? Perhaps more important, are you aware of how great a problem this still is?

First championed in Britain by Prince Albert in the 19th century and attempted throughout the pre-war years (but halted by the depression in the 1930s), social housing became commonplace during the 1950s following the major housing that sprung from the end of the Second World War. With the Government forced to take greater responsibility for helping to provide the general public with new, affordable housing, there were one million new homes built between 1945 and 1955.

Unfortunately, this remains an issue today. In fact, across England over 1.2 million households are on the social housing waiting list. This clearly suggests that there needs to be far more investment in social housing schemes throughout the country in order to make a difference!

Central to a just, democratic society is being able to look after those that might not be able to help themselves. As such, providing adequate housing is at the heart of this and continuing this tradition is essential.

PMB Holdings is playing its role in this tradition and is excited to be able to offer more affordable housing to Berwick Street. We are proud to provide four family-sized affordable homes with three-bedroom, four-person family units of 920sq ft each in our new Berwick Street development. In doing so, it will mean that trendy Soho sustains its iconic legacy as a bustling home to people from all walks of life.

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